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Farm to fork : cooking local, cooking fresh /

Farm to fork : cooking local, cooking fresh /
Book
Lagasse, Emeril.
Copies: 3; Reserves: 0

Lagasse offers recipes that will inspire cooks to utilize organic and locally-grown seasonal produce. The recipes are organized by growing season, and include helpful tips on canning and choosing naturally-raised meats and seafood.
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 copies


Call NumberBranchStatusVolume
641.5973 Lagasse KR In at KR (Kisker Road)
641.5973 Lagasse SP In at SP (Spencer Road)
641.5973 Lagasse SP In at SP (Spencer Road)


 catalog record


Control No. 706213
LCCN 2009052670
ISBN 9780061742958 (pbk.)
ISBN 0061742953 (pbk.)
ISBN 9780061742781 (hardcover)
ISBN 0061742783 (hardcover)
Author Lagasse Emeril
Title Farm to fork : -- cooking local, cooking fresh / -- Emeril Lagasse ; with photography by Steven Freeman.
Edition Statement 1st ed.
Publisher Information [New York] : -- HarperStudio, -- c2010.
Physical Description xxii, 312 p. : -- col. ill. ; -- 24 cm.
Series Title Ask Alison recommended
General Note Includes index.
Formatted Contents Note The herb garden -- Milk, eggs, and cheese -- Leafy greens -- The three sisters: corn, beans, and squash -- Nightshades -- Berries, figs, and melons -- The orchard -- Cole crops: broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower -- Thistles, stalks, and pods -- Roots, shoots, tubers, and bulbs -- Winter fruits -- From the mill -- Fresh off the dock -- Out on the range -- Home economics: preserving the harvest.
Summary Lagasse offers recipes that will inspire cooks to utilize organic and locally-grown seasonal produce. The recipes are organized by growing season, and include helpful tips on canning and choosing naturally-raised meats and seafood.
Subject Cooking American
Subject Farm produce




 annotations (4)


Annotation 1 Lagasse offers recipes that will inspire cooks to utilize organic and locally-grown seasonal produce. The recipes are organized by growing season, and include helpful tips on canning and choosing naturally-raised meats and seafood.

Annotation 2 Offers recipes that will inspire cooks to utilize organic and locally-grown seasonal produce, organizing the recipes by growing season and including helpful tips on canning and choosing naturally-raised meats and seafood.

Annotation 3 The famous TV chef and author of Emeril: 20-40-60 offers recipes that will inspire cooks to utilize organic and locally-grown seasonal produce, in a book with full-color photos that draws on the themes featured on the author's cable show Emeril Green. Original. 125,000 first printing.

Annotation 4 Farm to Fork brings out the “green” in Emeril with recipes that will inspire cooks, new and old, to utilize fresh, organic, and locally-grown ingredients throughout the year. A must have for those interested in the Green and locavore movements, and the legions of Emeril’s own fans!

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 reviews (3)


BookPage Reviews 2010 August
Emeril goes emerald

There’s a green sheen on Emeril Lagasse, as there is now on most cookbook authors, restaurateurs and anyone else talking publicly about food. His new book, Farm to Fork: Cooking Local, Cooking Fresh, is this kick-it-up-a-notch celebrity chef’s nod to the current requirement to pay homage to fresh and local foods. Take Emeril at his word: He buys only the best ingredients, knows his purveyors, focuses on the super-seasonal and wants you to do the same. Freshness philosophy understood, it’s Emeril’s recipes—over 150, with their detailed instructions and fun, informative headers—that make this a really worthwhile new source. Check out the herb oils, Pickled Green Beans and easy, non-canned Peach Freezer Jam. And don’t miss the Cantaloupe and Pancetta Cream Sauce for Pasta (sounds like a weird combo, but it’s really good), Toasted Garlic Romano Beans, and Apricot Clafouti. Emeril, tinged with green or not, is always a good bet.

DINING WITH DONNA LEON

To Commissario Guido Brunetti, the appealing Venetian detective who stars in Donna Leon’s celebrated mystery series, eating well, in a way that provides “as much physical pleasure as possible,” is fundamental to living a happy life. Brunetti solves crimes, muses on the problems that beset Venice and savors the fabulous meals cooked by his wife, Paola. These succulent lunches and dinners have become so central to the series that fans have been clamoring for the recipes. Now nearly 100 Brunetti-inspired recipes by Roberta Pianaro, Leon’s dearest Venetian friend and gastronomic guide, have been gathered in Brunetti’s Cookbook, along with six original essays by Leon herself and book excerpts highlighting Brunetti’s favorite dishes. They range from antipasti to dolci—some familiar, such as Spaghetti all’Amatriciana, and others, like Rabbit with Olives and Walnuts, engagingly unfamiliar. One caveat: Roberta’s instructions are done in Italian style and assume some kitchen know-how and ease with ingredients. And some of these ingredients—Trevisio radicchio or cuttlefish eggs, for example—might be a bit difficult to find, but are well worth the effort.

COOKBOOK OF THE MONTH

Rick Bayless is the undisputed Big Enchilada of Mexican cooking north of the border. With his six previous cookbooks, PBS series, restaurants and product line, he has turned many gringos into avid aficionados of the real cocina Mexicana. This time around, Rick’s kicking back and having a party, and we’re all invited. To join the fun, open a copy of Fiesta at Rick’s: Fabulous Food for Great Times with Friends, pick a party, choose a few recipes and pour a few cocktails. Rick is a master at riffing on Mexican mainstays like guacamole (at least nine riffs), ceviche (six riffs) and margaritas (lost count while tasting), using his deep understanding of vibrant Mexican flavors to innovate and his cooking know-how to make his recipes totally doable in American kitchens. Want to have a Luxury Guacamole Bar Cocktail Party, with the added sparkle of Champagne Margaritas? No problema! There’s a menu, recipes and a game plan with serving strategies that tell you what to do and when. Same goes for a Summertime Seafood Cocktail Party or a Fall Fiesta. Buen provecho!

Copyright 2010 BookPage Reviews.

LJ Reviews 2010 May #2

Lagasse's contribution to the recent spate of cookbooks celebrating locally produced American foods illustrates his genius for amping up the flavor in foods. Recipes such as Bay, Thyme, and Rosemary Roasted Potatoes; Creamy Spiced Rice Pudding; Curry-Scented Roasted Cauliflower; and the Pink Lady Apple Martini are imbued with fresh, vibrant, and balanced flavors. Readers should be warned that these recipes, while they use lots of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, are not light. Also, some don't seem to have been tested thoroughly. The Braised Pinto Beans, for instance, were still quite hard after the one hour of cooking specified in the instructions. These minor caveats aside, the recipes tend to be easy and delicious. VERDICT Highly recommended for those looking for inventive ideas for using local ingredients.—Jane la Plante, Minot State Univ. Lib., ND

[Page 91]. Copyright 2010 Reed Business Information.

PW Reviews 2010 April #3

Ignore the labored title and forgive his first sentence, "I have had a connection with the soil since I was a young boy." This is simply another of Lagasse's highly competent creations, full of flavorful recipes presented with simplicity and minimal chitchat. The third in a 10-book series ordered up by Harper Studio back in 2008, the celebrity chef this time goes green, with a focus on using fresh, local ingredients. This collection focuses on fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy, and seafood, with just a little poultry and pork thrown in for good measure. Chapters are broken out as if dividing up a garden. Corn, beans, and squash over here; broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower over there. Leafy greens, root vegetables, and orchard fruits all get their due, with space left for winter fruits and nightshades. Among the 152 offerings, one can dish up lemon-scented blueberry pancakes for breakfast; Emeril's roasted beet salad, along with perhaps an eggplant relish crostini for lunch; and a dinner of, say, creamy turnip soup, braised broccoli rabe, and gumbo with smoked ham and wild rice. Dessert choices include pumpkin custard pie and apricot clafouti. Wash it all down with some watermelon limeade or enjoy a nightcap after the nightshades, like a pink lady apple martini. (June)

[Page 48]. Copyright 2010 Reed Business Information.

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