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Plants vs. meats : the health, history, and ethics of what we eat  /

Plants vs. meats : the health, history, and ethics of what we eat /
Book
Hughes, Meredith Sayles,
Copies: 1; Reserves: 0

Examines the nutritional, historical, and ethical aspects of food consumption, discussing popular diets, providing facts about farming and the future of food, and encouraging readers to make informed, personal food choices.
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Call NumberBranchStatusVolume
YA 641.3 Hughes CP In at CP (Corporate Parkway)


 catalog record


Control No. 1216530
ISBN 9781467780117
ISBN 1467780111
Author Hughes Meredith Sayles
Title Plants vs. meats : -- the health, history, and ethics of what we eat / -- Meredith Sayles Hughes.
Physical Description 96 pages : -- color illustrations -- 24 cm
Series Title Ask Alison recommended
Summary "No one can live without food, but what you eat is a personal decision. In the tweny-first century, many people are choosing to eat more vegetables and fruits and less meat. But is all meat bad for you? What does science say? And what about sugar and trans fats, which are linked to diabetes and heart disease? In addition to health concerns, people make food choices for ethical and religious reasons. Some ancient religions asserted that killing animals was wrong, a belief that persists among modern vegetarians and vegans. Some twenty-first century consumers shun meat from factory farms-- where animals are crowded into stalls and fattened up with antibiotics and hormones. An increasing number of people seek out foods grown locally, especially those raised without chemical pesticides, using agricultural methods that keep the soil healthy and do not waste water. As the Earth's population grows, chefs, nutritionists, and scientists are considering how to feed the world. The future of
Subject Food Social aspects Young adult literature
Subject Diet Young adult literature
Subject Vegetarianism Young adult literature
Subject Vegetarian foods Young adult literature
Subject Food Ethics Young adult literature
Subject - Local Young adult




 annotations (2)


Annotation 1 Examines the nutritional, historical, and ethical aspects of food consumption, discussing popular diets, providing facts about farming and the future of food, and encouraging readers to make informed, personal food choices.

Annotation 2

No one can live without food, but what you eat is a personal decision. Today many people are examining nutritional advice and choosing to eat more vegetables and fruits and less meat. But is all meat bad for you? What does the science say?

People also make food choices for ethical and religious reasons. Some vegetarians and vegans avoid meat because they believe killing animals is wrong. Other people shun meat from factory farms. Recently, more people are seeking out foods grown locally and organically.

What do you choose to eat and why? This book will help you make decisions to support your values.

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 reviews (6)


Booklist Reviews 2016 February #2
*Starred Review* Hughes offers a compact but comprehensive guide to food production and consumption in the U.S., taking on its history, as well as ethical and health concerns, in the interest of fostering conscientious eating. While the title implies a focus on vegetarianism, the scope is far broader. Hughes lays out an array of dietary options—vegetarian, vegan, flexitarian, omnivore, and so on—rooting the discussion in personal choice. After establishing that people typically give up eating meat for heath or ethical reasons, she takes readers on a whirlwind tour of the major areas impacting the food we eat. First, she looks at the influence that religion, availability, and historical factors (especially war) have had on food consumption. Next up: fad diets. Hughes effectively exonerates maligned foods (fat, carbs, sugar, gluten), pointing to the drawbacks of excess, preservatives, and refined ingredients, while offering expert opinions and contrasting viewpoints in food debates. The following chapter examines food production, comparing industrial and smaller-scale farming practices. Animal welfare is addressed but not sensationalized, as are the pros and cons of monoculture, genetically engineered, and organic crops. Finally, she turns to ideas of sustainability and the future of farming, encouraging readers to be knowledgeable about their choices. Fact boxes and color illustrations further enhance this admirably balanced, bite-size primer on ethical eating. Copyright 2014 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews 2016 Fall
This well-researched text discusses what our prehistoric and BCE ancestors ate; the science of nutrition and changing dietary recommendations (e.g., the late-twentieth-century "low-fat frenzy"); and the effects of corporate farming on the land, animals, and our health. The book, illustrated with stock photos, concludes with intriguing new trends, such as aquaponics and food-info apps. Reading list, websites. Bib., glos., ind. Copyright 2016 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

Kirkus Reviews 2016 January #1
The moral, healthful, and historical reasons we eat what we eat. Former vegetarian and food historian Hughes begins her exposé by defining some "-isms," detailing what people who call themselves vegan or vegetarian or pescatarian (among others) eat. She touches on the historical factors that influence what we all eat and then examines some religious and philosophical restrictions on what some of us consume. A discussion of fad diets and the ingredients their proponents feel are harmful (gluten, fat, etc.) is followed by a look at the sources of food and the way this affects food availability and the environment. Finally she explores the future of food: insect protein, 3-D printing of food, and hydroponics, among others. Hughes is careful not to paint black-and-white pictures of any stance on food or make strident arguments for eating one type of food over another (though she does promote healthful food over junk food), though some of the people she quotes obviously have strong opinions. She instead urges readers to make informed decisions based on their personal ethics and healthful food information. To further help with this, she provides source notes for the quotes she cites, a glossary, a list of further reading, and website and film lists at the close. Good food for thought that won't leave readers feeling stuffed. (Nonfiction. 12-18) Copyright Kirkus 2015 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

School Library Connection Reviews 2016 October

This slim, attractive volume packs a comprehensive, nonjudgemental discussion about contemporary vegetarianism and other food choices and the impact of those choices on agriculture, animal husbandry, one's health, and ethical considerations. More than a third of the text chronicles the history of what people ate based upon availability and religious and social constraints from prehistoric times to the present. Also presented are conflicting controversial concerns about government dietary recommendations, fats, gluten, cholesterol, sugar, GMOs and genetic engineering, organic farming, sustainability, water use in agriculture, and future food. The author aims to provide a solid basis of information teens can use to make informed choices about their food selections that will benefit their health and happiness and positively affect our food supply. Pair this with Foodprints: The Story of What We Eat (Annick Press, 2015), for additional food science, history, and dietary recommendations. Additional Resources. Bibliography. Glossary. Index. Source Notes.

- Grades 7-12 - Karen Leon - Recommended

SLJ Reviews 2016 February

Gr 6 Up—With information about new eating regimes and environmental and health concerns coming out each year, this is a timely, student-friendly primer on the historical, nutritional, and ethical impacts of what and how humans eat. Discussing popular diets, from paleo to locavore, as well as the history of the growth and consumption of food from prehistoric times to the present, this book presents facts from both sides of the vegetarian-omnivore debate, leaving readers to make their own food choices. Sections on the business of farming and the environmental impact of raising animals and crops are eye-opening, highlighting fascinating tidbits ("it takes 441 gallons of water to produce 1 pound of beef"). References to pop culture figures, such as Beyonce, who is a vegan, and a final chapter on recent food developments, including 3-D-printed food, add further appeal. The material is well organized and well labeled and supported by interesting and colorful images and sidebars. VERDICT This solid introduction to where food comes from and the consequences of its consumption and production is a worthy addition.—Marian McLeod, Convent of the Sacred Heart, Greenwich, CT

[Page 123]. (c) Copyright 2016 Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

SLJ Reviews 2016 March

Gr 6 Up—With information about new eating regimes and environmental and health concerns coming out each year, this is a timely, student-friendly primer on the historical, nutritional, and ethical impacts of what and how humans eat. Discussing popular diets, from paleo to locavore, as well as the history of the growth and consumption of food from prehistoric times to the present, this book presents facts from both sides of the vegetarian-omnivore debate, leaving readers to make their own food choices. Sections on the business of farming and the environmental impact of raising animals and crops are eye-opening, highlighting fascinating tidbits ("it takes 441 gallons of water to produce 1 pound of beef"). References to pop culture figures, such as Beyonce, who is a vegan, and a final chapter on recent food developments, including 3-D-printed food, add further appeal. The material is well organized and well labeled and supported by interesting and colorful images and sidebars. VERDICT This solid introduction to where food comes from and the consequences of its consumption and production is a worthy addition.—Marian McLeod, Convent of the Sacred Heart, Greenwich, CT

[Page 123]. (c) Copyright 2016 Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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