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The spectrum of hope : an optimistic and new approach to alzheimer's disease and

The spectrum of hope : an optimistic and new approach to alzheimer's disease and
eAudio
Devi, Gayatri.
Copies: 1

Imagine finding a glimmer of good news in a diagnosis of Alzheimer's. And imagine how that would change the outlook of the five million Americans who suffer from Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, not to mention their families, loved ones, and caretakers. A neurologist who's been specializing in dement (more)

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eAudio OL eAudio (hoopla)


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Control No. 1446879
ISBN 9781541498686 (sound recording : hoopla Audio Book)
ISBN 1541498682 (sound recording : hoopla Audio Book)
Publisher No. MWT11993896
Author Devi Gayatri
Title The spectrum of hope : -- an optimistic and new approach to alzheimer's disease and other dementias -- [electronic resource] / -- Gayatri Devi, M.D.
Edition Statement Unabridged.
Physical Description 1 online resource (1 audio file (12hr., 43 min.)) : -- digital.
Restrictions on Access Note Digital content provided by hoopla.
Participant or Performer Note Narrated by Wendy Tremont King.
Summary Imagine finding a glimmer of good news in a diagnosis of Alzheimer's. And imagine how that would change the outlook of the five million Americans who suffer from Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, not to mention their families, loved ones, and caretakers. A neurologist who's been specializing in dementia and memory loss for more than twenty years, Dr. Gayatri Devi rewrites the story of Alzheimer's by defining it as a spectrum disorder-like autism, Alzheimer's is a disease that affects different people differently. She encourages people who are worried about memory impairment to seek a diagnosis, because early treatment will enable doctors and caregivers to manage the disease more effectively through drugs and other therapies. Told through the stories of Dr. Devi's patients, The Spectrum of Hope is the kind of narrative medical writing that is gripping, humanizes the science, and offers equal parts practical advice and wisdom with skillful ease. But beyond the pleasures of g
Subject Families
Alternate Author King Wendy Tremont
Alternate Author hoopla digital
Electronic Location https://www.hoopladigital.com/title/11993896 -- Instantly available on hoopla.
Electronic Location Cover image -- https://d2snwnmzyr8jue.cloudfront.net/ttm_9781541498686_180.jpeg




 annotations (1)


Annotation 1

Imagine finding a glimmer of good news in a diagnosis of Alzheimer's. And imagine how that would change the outlook of the five million Americans who suffer from Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, not to mention their families, loved ones, and caretakers. A neurologist who's been specializing in dementia and memory loss for more than twenty years, Dr. Gayatri Devi rewrites the story of Alzheimer's by defining it as a spectrum disorder—like autism, Alzheimer's is a disease that affects different people differently. She encourages people who are worried about memory impairment to seek a diagnosis, because early treatment will enable doctors and caregivers to manage the disease more effectively through drugs and other therapies.

Told through the stories of Dr. Devi's patients, The Spectrum of Hope is the kind of narrative medical writing that is gripping, humanizes the science, and offers equal parts practical advice and wisdom with skillful ease. But beyond the pleasures of great listening, it's a book that offers real hope.

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 reviews (1)


LJ Reviews 2017 November #1

With most baby boomers already in their 70s—and their surviving parents in their 90s—there is a rise in age-related Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias. Most people have a family member or friend who has a form of dementia, and many aging adults are concerned about their own cognitive health. Lenox Hill Hospital neurologist Devi (director, New York Memory and Healthy Aging Svcs.) views the disease as a spectrum disorder that presents and progresses differently in people. Early diagnosis is key: taking into account memory loss, language and life skills, and rate of progression, all of which may vary widely. People in early or preclinical stages can benefit from diet and lifestyle modifications and physical and cognitive exercises; those further along may experience improvement from medications as well as magnetic brain stimulation (not yet FDA-approved for AD). The author includes stories of her patients, most of whom live at home, though some continue to work, drive, and conduct other activities, with adequate and appropriate support. VERDICT Readers will feel the hope and compassion that guides Devi's work and learn to see AD and other dementias as more than a fearful disaster.—Marcia G. Welsh, Dartmouth Coll. Lib., Hanover, NH

Copyright 2017 Library Journal.

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