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Unwholly /

Unwholly /
eBook
Shusterman, Neal.
Copies: 1

"Thanks to Connor, Lev, and Risa, and their high-profile revolt at Happy Jack Harvest Camp, people can no longer turn a blind eye to unwinding. Ridding society of troublesome teens and, in the same stroke, providing much-needed tissues for transplant might be convenient, but its morality has finally been brough (more)
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Electronic book OL View Electronic Book (OverDrive)


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Control No. 1115370
ISBN 9781442423688 -- electronic bk.
ISBN 1442423684 -- electronic bk.
Publisher No. EB00565928 -- Recorded Books
Author Shusterman Neal
Title Unwholly / -- Neal Shusterman.
Publisher Information [S.l.] : -- Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, -- 2014.
Physical Description 1 online resource.
Series Statement Unwind Dystology ; -- [bk. 2]
Summary Rife with action and suspense, this riveting companion to the perennially popular Unwind challenges assumptions about where life begins and ends'and what it means to live. Thanks to Connor, Lev, and Risa'and their high-profile revolt at Happy Jack Harvest Camp'people can no longer turn a blind eye to unwinding. Ridding society of troublesome teens while simltaneously providing much-needed tissues for transplant might be convenient, but its morality has finally been brought into question. However, unwinding has become big business, and there are powerful political and corporate interests that want to see it not only continue, but also expand to the unwinding of prisoners and the impoverished. Cam is a product of unwinding; made entirely out of the parts of other unwinds, he is a teen who does not technically exist. A futuristic Frankenstein, Cam struggles with a search for identity and meaning and wonders if a rewound being can have a soul. And when the actions of a sadistic bount
Target Audience 7 years and up.
Subject Revolutionaries Fiction Young adult literature
Subject Fugitives from justice Fiction Young adult literature
Subject Identity Fiction Young adult literature
Subject Survival Fiction Young adult literature
Subject Electronic books
Subject Young adult literature
Subject Science fiction Young adult literature
Alternate Author OverDrive Inc
Alternate Author Shusterman Neal
Electronic Location http://overdrive.youranswerplace.org/ContentDetails.htm?ID=844CCA31-B658-4DB3-ADE4-C3687D47A3BA
Electronic Location Image -- http://images.contentreserve.com/ImageType-100/0439-1/{844CCA31-B658-4DB3-ADE4-C3687D47A3BA}Img100.jpg




 annotations (2)


Annotation 1 "Thanks to Connor, Lev, and Risa, and their high-profile revolt at Happy Jack Harvest Camp, people can no longer turn a blind eye to unwinding. Ridding society of troublesome teens and, in the same stroke, providing much-needed tissues for transplant might be convenient, but its morality has finally been brought into question. However, unwinding has become big business, and there are powerful political and corporate interests that want to see it not only continue, but expand, allowing the unwinding of prisoners and the impoverished. Cam is a teen who does not exist. He is made entirely out of the parts of other unwinds. Cam, a 21st century Frankenstein, struggles with a search for identity and meaning, as well as the concept of his own soul, if indeed a rewound being can have one. When a sadistic bounty hunter who takes "trophies" from the unwinds he captures starts to pursue Connor, Risa and Lev, Cam finds his fate inextricably bound with theirs"--

Annotation 2 Rife with action and suspense, this riveting companion to the perennially popular Unwind challenges assumptions about where life begins and ends—and what it means to live.

Thanks to Connor, Lev, and Risa—and their high-profile revolt at Happy Jack Harvest Camp—people can no longer turn a blind eye to unwinding. Ridding society of troublesome teens while simltaneously providing much-needed tissues for transplant might be convenient, but its morality has finally been brought into question. However, unwinding has become big business, and there are powerful political and corporate interests that want to see it not only continue, but also expand to the unwinding of prisoners and the impoverished.

Cam is a product of unwinding; made entirely out of the parts of other unwinds, he is a teen who does not technically exist. A futuristic Frankenstein, Cam struggles with a search for identity and meaning and wonders if a rewound being can have a soul. And when the actions of a sadistic bounty hunter cause Cam’s fate to become inextricably bound with the fates of Connor, Risa, and Lev, he’ll have to question humanity itself.

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 reviews (6)


Booklist Reviews 2012 July #1
Having floated a Modest Proposal to convert troublesome teenagers into involuntary organ donors in the near-futuristic Unwind (2007), Shusterman uncorks his version of a Frankenstein's monster for this middle volume in the planned trilogy. Constructed by the shadowy Proactive Citizenry from grafted parts of 99 gifted donors, and with a face that is a carefully designed patchwork of skin colors, Camus Comprix accepts his role as the centerpiece of a public campaign to expand the general "harvest"—until he falls in love and begins to develop ideas of his own. Literary antecedents aside, Shusterman continues to develop and expertly twist plotlines begun in the first book, picking up the pace with short chapters and a present-tense narrative while interspersing for verisimilitude actual recent news items about real organ harvesting and abandoned and "feral" teens. Perfectly poised to catch the Hunger Games wave and based on an even more plausible dystopian scenario, this episode leaves its central cast of escaped teens in midflight, and should leave its target audience thoroughly discomfited. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: It has taken almost five years for this sequel to the highly praised Unwind to arrive, so fans will want to get their hands on this the second it's released. Copyright 2012 Booklist Reviews.

Horn Book Guide Reviews 2013 Spring
In this Unwind sequel, unwinding (harvesting body parts of unwanted teens for transplanting) continues, and Connor, Lev, and Risa are still caught up in the fray. The particularly targeted storked kids (left on doorsteps as infants) are given a sharper focus in this volume, adding depth to the picture of this dystopic society; Shusterman elegantly balances the different perspectives of the protagonists.

Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2012 #5
In this long-awaited sequel to Unwind (rev. 3/08), the complex feelings about unwinding (the legal policy of harvesting the body parts of unwanted or "bad" teens for transplant purposes) continues on all sides. Connor, Lev, and Risa are still caught up in the fray, though they each imagine what life would be like if they weren't, in their different ways, viewed as representations of rebel causes but rather as ordinary teens. No one escapes unscathed in a world where most of society looks for excuses to kill kids for their healthy body parts (or at least turn a blind eye to it), but the storked kids, those who as infants were left on doorsteps and never given a chance to forget this fact, are particularly targeted, and damaged. These kids are given a sharper focus in this novel; it is a painful exploration that adds significant depth to the overall picture of what drives all kinds of teens in this dystopic society. Shusterman elegantly balances the strikingly different perspectives of the three main protagonists effectively, and these dissimilar approaches to life highlight the ways in which the larger world grapples with unwinding. Readers who haven't read the first volume will miss a great deal of nuance and historical context, though the high quality of UnWholly will inspire readers to go back to see what was missed as well as stoke anticipation for the final book. april spisak

Kirkus Reviews 2012 July #2
After surviving the attack on the Happy Jack Harvest Camp, the heroes from Unwind (2007) lead the revolt against the Unwind Accord. Connor, aka the Akron AWOL, now heads up the resistance at the Graveyard, an abandoned airfield where 700-plus unwind escapees live in hiding. His wheelchair-bound girlfriend, Risa, who also survived the attack, serves as the Graveyard's nurse. Lev, a former tithe, now leads missions to rescue other tithes from unwinding and sends them to a camp where they can cope. Enter Cam, a schizophrenic, teenage Frankenstein built from the body parts of 99 different unwound teens. Shusterman mercifully supplies a Q&A at the front of this sequel to help readers fill in details from Book 1 in the trilogy. He also does an expert job of plunging them headfirst into his disturbing, dystopic and dangerous future world where teenagers are either handed over by their parents or kidnapped for "unwinding," or organ harvesting. While the plot moves quickly, the work definitely reads like a sequel--a good one. Shusterman is obviously setting the scene for a big climax in Book 3, and his only fault is excess. There are so many new characters and plot twists and segues that readers may feel overwhelmed or confused, but that won't stop them from turning the pages. A breathless, unsettling read. (Science fiction. 12 & up) Copyright Kirkus 2012 Kirkus/BPI Communications.All rights reserved.

Library Media Connection Reviews 2013 March/April
Combine Golding's Lord of the Flies with Lowry's Gathering Blue (Houghton Mifflin, 2000) and you will be close to this second title in the Unwind Trilogy. The book addresses a society where troublesome children are dealt with by unwinding, the killing of and harvesting of their parts. They are selected by their parents as a way to get rid of a troublesome child, leading to a society where only the good and acceptable reach adulthood. This book focuses on a group of children who have founded a compound in the wilderness, governing themselves. This book considers the issue of who should survive, the one or the many. Readers will come to think deeply about the question of survival, and to what extremes one would go to for survival of themselves and loved ones. This book is a welcome addition to a science fiction collection, with threads of romance, adventure, and alternate universes which are closer to becoming reality. Sara Rofofsky Marcus, MALS Student, Empire State College, Bayside, ew York [Editor's Note: Available in e-book format.] RECOMMENDED Copyright 2012 Linworth Publishing, Inc.

SLJ Reviews 2012 September

Gr 9 Up—This sequel to Unwind (S & S, 2007) is well worth the wait. Connor is now the leader of the Graveyard, a place in Arizona that serves as a refuge for "troubled" teens who escaped unwinding, a process where individuals are "divided" for their body parts. Risa is confined to a wheelchair and works as the group's medical authority. She can only watch helplessly as Connor drifts further and further away from her. Lev lives under house arrest and ministers to jailed youths, trying to make his life mean something. Unwinding is still widely practiced, and the threat of government action hangs over all of the characters. Shusterman throws plenty of new conflicts and characters into the mix. Nelson, a "parts pirate," will stop at nothing to hunt down Connor, while new guy Starkey wants to usurp him and become the Graveyard leader. Cam is made completely from parts taken from dozens of unwinds and is being groomed by a shadowy organization as the future of humanity. Like the first book, this one requires a large suspension of disbelief, but the characters, action, and drama make it easy for readers to be drawn into the story and the weighty issues, such as what it means to be human and what it means to sacrifice for others. Several plot twists at the end not only make for a satisfying conclusion, but also expertly set the stage for the final installment of the trilogy.—Anthony C. Doyle, Livingston High School Library, CA

[Page 156]. (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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